Only applying to one public housing authority

There are not enough Section 8 vouchers or public housing units to help everyone who needs housing. When you apply to one of these programs, you usually are put on a waiting list. Some areas have very long waiting lists. In order to speed up the process of getting housing, you should apply to as many housing authorities as possible in the areas where you want to live.

Search for local public housing authorities (PHAs).

Not asking for help

If you have difficulty with the application or finding an apartment, tell your housing authority. They can help you. If your disability makes any part of the application process hard for you, the housing authority must provide reasonable accommodations. This might be extra help in filling out the application, extra time finding rental housing, or help to find housing that meets your needs.

Not returning to work because you fear you’ll lose your rental subsidy

If you get Section 8 or live in public housing and have a disability, you can get an Earned Income Disregard (EID) so that you can work without having your rent go up. If you have an EID, for the first year after you start working, the increase in your income caused by work is not counted towards your rent, so your portion of the rent stays the same. In the second year, only half of the amount your income goes up thanks to work is counted. That means, your rent only goes up half as much as it would if you didn’t have an EID.

Not responding to waiting list update letters

Most housing authorities update their waiting lists often to make sure that everyone on them still wants a voucher. When you don’t respond to a letter from a housing authority, they probably think you don’t want a voucher and they’ll take you off the waiting list.

Not updating contact information while you are on a waiting list

While you are on a waiting list, it is very important to tell the housing authority about any changes in your contact information. If the housing authority is unable to contact you, they may take you off the list.

Not getting expert help when you are having trouble paying your mortgage

If you are having trouble paying your mortgage, or you are already facing foreclosure, it can be hard to figure out what you should do. The first step is to call for help:
  • The Step Forward Michigan Program at 1-866-946-7432 may be able to help you catch up on your mortgage or tax payments.
  • Making Home Affordable offers a national hotline with counselors available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-888-995-HOPE (4673).
  • The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Counseling & Agency Locator Line at 1-800-569-4287 can refer you to a housing counselor who can guide you through the process.